• Tristan Angelini

On the uncertainty of the future for people experiencing homelessness




There has been an ongoing battle that so many affluent countries have been facing for a few years now. And no, the opponent is not a virus nor another country – it is against homelessness.


Homeless individuals were hit pretty hard when the pandemic broke out. So many had to be placed into temporary accommodation. Rough sleepers – a term formed by the Government that defines individuals that sleep in the streets and with no safe place to spend the night, is a result of homelessness. The really sad thing about being homeless aside from the lack of a healthy and safe place to call home is that every day is an ongoing challenge. When you’ve got no place to live, the uncertainty is more palpable.

The Victorian Government was able to provide temporary hotel accommodations to homeless individuals in response to the current efforts to keep everyone safe from the coronavirus. It’s also necessary to slow down the spreading because as long as people are in the streets, the virus will continue to infect so many people.

Just like the virus, homelessness does not discriminate. Anyone can be affected. However, housing is a basic human need. Everyone deserves to have a safe place to call home and this should not be something difficult to attain. This is a serious matter that shouldn’t be ignored, which is why there’s an annual reminder.

The Homelessness week is an annual awareness-raising week to give focus on the 116,000 homeless Australians. Every year this event has a theme. Last August 3-8, the Homelessness Week was held with the theme, “Everybody Needs A Home”.

In the last 20 years, probably the main reason why homelessness is so rampant is because of the lack of social housing. Now more than ever, the need for more suitable housing has to be highlighted, which is exactly why the Homelessness Week is such an important event. The last census indicated that over 25,000 Victorians have no place to call home – many of which are in overcrowded situations, while 20% “are living in housing stress”. Truly, homelessness does not only affect the physiological aspect, but the emotional, mental, and psychological aspects too.

A single mother perfectly encapsulates and describes what it is like not having a home.

“This has just affected my ability to be in the present moment with my children. Feelings of worry and anxiety about where we will live. Feeling outside of the rest of the world who have secure housing. Not being able to give my child things because I can’t afford to.”

It is important that as a privileged community, we can extend a helping hand to those who are in need. Here are some of the things you can do.

Sign the “Every Victorian Should Have A Home” petition. Link here.

Spread the word about the housing crisis in Victoria

Learn more about homelessness. Check out our blogs here.

Join the national everybody’s campaign https://everybodyshome.com.au/


Xotel vows to keep working with organizations to put an end to the increasing homelessness problem. It may not be quick, but we are committed to helping individuals find a place suitable and affordable. Check our social media pages for more information.

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